Los Angeles City Councilmember Herb Wesson | Protecting our homeless neighbors
The City’s Unified Homelessness Response Center (UHRC) has been carefully monitoring the novel coronavirus and coordinating closely with the City's Emergency Management Department, first responders, and public health professionals to prevent the spread of COVID-19 among the City’s unsheltered population.
homeless, COVID-19, coronavirus, Los Angeles
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COVID-19 and the Homeless

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March 19, 2020

Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) Response to COVID-19

  • To date, LAHSA has deployed more than 300 handwashing stations. The LAHSA team is working on a map to show where the stations are located countywide.
  • The LAHSA team has secured more than 900 Winter Shelter beds  countywide that will continue 24-hours until September 2020.
  • LAHSA is partnering with the city to create Low Barrier Congregate shelters bringing on 6,000 beds across 42 Park and Recreation centers.

March 18, 2020

Thousands of Temporary Shelter Beds for Homeless Angelenos as part of COVID-19 Response

Mayor Eric Garcetti today announced that with the help of the Los Angeles City Council, L.A. will add thousands of emergency shelter beds to help get homeless Angelenos indoors more quickly as part of comprehensive efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19.

The Mayor highlighted several actions he and the City Council are taking, including:

  • Partnering with the City Council to use $20 million in budget reserve funds on emergency relief efforts
  • Adding 1,600 emergency shelter beds in thirteen City recreation centers by the end of this week, and scaling up to dozens more locations in the coming days with more than 6,000 beds provided by the American Red Cross.
  • Working with the County, LAHSA, and other partners to identify individuals in the homeless population who face the greatest risk from the novel coronavirus.
  • Activating the Disaster Service Worker program, which will place some City employees in temporary roles to assist efforts.

March 17, 2020

Protecting Our Homeless Neighbors

The City’s Unified Homelessness Response Center (UHRC) has been carefully monitoring the novel coronavirus and coordinating closely with the City’s Emergency Management Department, first responders, and public health professionals to prevent the spread of COVID-19 among the City’s unsheltered population. Our UHRC is working alongside our partners at LAHSA and the L.A. County Department of Public Health to ensure unsheltered Angelenos have accurate and up-to-date information about the virus and are equipped with vital health and safety resources.

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19 to our vulnerable homeless neighbors, the City’s housed population should heed the advice of public health experts: Stay home if you are feeling sick, wash your hands often with soap and water, avoid touching your face, and practice social distancing.

The City is taking the following actions to protect unsheltered Angelenos:

  • Convening critical partners — including LA Sanitation, LAPD, and LAHSA — to coordinate support protocols for individuals experiencing homelessness who show potential signs of illness during citywide CARE operations
  • Deploying hand washing stations citywide and distributing hand sanitizer to unsheltered Angelenos
  • Training outreach workers to closely monitor homeless encampments for individuals with COVID-19 symptoms
  • Continuing to partner with UCLA medical professionals to provide primary care and treatment to individuals experiencing homelessness via the City’s CARE mobile hygiene trailers
  • Mapping existing encampments to determine proximity to existing public bathrooms in order to identify locations for additional hand washing and hygiene stations
  • On Tuesday, March 17,  the Los Angeles City Council approved a temporary stop to enforcement of a law requiring tents to come down during day time hours in an effort to limit the spread of COVID-19.